Business Process Analysis

Business Process Analysis

It can take several years to begin to see any rewarding returns from an IT related business transformation (Radhakrishnan, Zu and Grover. 2008), making it a daunting task for new and existing organizations. Successful business transformations require in-depth analysis of operational and management processes in order to better understand where improvements can be made.

Operational processes typically involve the tasks related to the business’ primary services. On the smaller scale these can include (but not limited to) logging customer data, quality control, delivery tracking and others. Automation of these day-to-day activities is a common example of business transformation. It aims to improve efficiency and accuracy of product/service delivery, resulting in increased output (Radhakrishnan, Zu and Grover. 2008).

Scheduling, reporting and other administrative tasks help organizations communicate and assist with critical decision making. In regards to business transformation, these are considered to be management processes. Automation of management processes can be beneficial to a company, however there is more value in systems that can informate and transform organizational structure (Radhakrishnan, Zu and Grover. 2008). Examples include: implementing knowledge and document management systems, deploying customer relationship systems, utilizing system data for performance reporting and monitoring(Watson & Holmes 2009).

Understanding the complexity and value of each process will allow a business to research and develop management capabilities and process capabilities. Measuring the value of a process capability against industry averages can assist when identifying where a business should make changes and the degree of change required (Radhakrishnan, Zu and Grover. 2008).

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